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Abstract

Ayurvedic face packs help store the wrinkles, pimples, acne and dark circles. They even make the skin more fair and smooth. The Natural Face Packs do contain some essential vitamins required for our skin’s health and glow. Such compounds are also proving beneficial in many ways for our bodies. Natural facial packs a less complex. They help us look after the skin and also prove its worthiness by through blood circulation within the facial veins.

Keywords

Hibiscus, Sandalwood, Multanimitti, Orange peel, Turmeric, Neem, face pack.

Introduction

Cosmetics are described as the products used to purify, embellish, encourage or alternate the appearance. Various herbs have been used since ancient times to clean, beautify and treat them.

The herbal pasties is called “Mukhalepa” in ayurveda, were used as facial therapy.

For the treatment of acne, pimple, rash, stains and pigments, this herbal paste smeared on the face face pack is the smooth powder used for facial application. Herbal face packs are cheaper and have no side effects to get fair skin naturally current research article deals with the formulation and evaluation of herbal face pack for radiant skin at home using natural materials such as Multanimitthi, turmeric, hibiscus , sandalwood, orange peel, chandan and neem. 

Various skin types require various kinds of herbal face packs. Homemade natural face packs and masks make way for smooth, healthy and silky skin. In ayurveda, the herbal paste applied to the face is known as “mukhalepa” for treating acne, pimples, wounds, stains and pigments “Mukhalepana” is the process of smearing a herbal mix on face. This therapy is now popularly termed as facial. Face pack is the smooth powder that is used for facial application and a good herbal face pack will supply the skin with the necessary nutrients and should penetrate the subcutaneous tissues to supply the nutrients needed. These packs are available in various styles and forms and are generally categorized as Plastic masks: wax-based, latex-based,or vinyl-based  Hydrocolloid masks: Gel masks (ready to use)  Argillaceous masks: clay based or earth-based (ready to use or dry powder)

History of Cosmetic:

Somewhere around 4000 BC, the first use of cosmetic substances were reported the origin of cosmetics forms a continuous. Narrative throughout the history of man as they developed. The man in prehistoric times 3000BC used colours for decoration to attract the animals that he wished to hunt and also the man survived attack from the enemy by colouring his skin and adorned his body for protection to provoke fear in an enemy (whether man or animal). The origin of cosmetics were associated with hunting, fighting, religion and superstition and later associated with medicine History of Skin Care- Though cosmetics have likely existed for even longer, the first evidence of cosmetics stems from ancient egypt, approximately 6,000 years ago. They used cosmetics for a variety of reasons, the first being for mummification, burial traditions, and honouring their gods and goddesses. They also used cosmetics to protect them from the elements - mainly sun rays and insects. Egyptians - like using aloe, myrrh, and frankincense. These products, particularly frankincense, were believed to possess anti- inflammatory properties and were used as anti-wrinkle creams by Ancient Egyptians.

Makeup was created using a variety of products including metal ore, copper, water, oil, animal fat, and precious stones. While Ancient Greeks and Romans used the ideas of the Ancient Egyptians, they took their skincare and beauty rituals one step further. Many Greeks and Romans would spend an entire day at the 'spa" to focus on their skin. Women commonly used white lead, crocodile dung, and chalk in order to lighten the appearance of their skin. They also created face masks with starch and eggs, which were believed to tighten the skin, reduce wrinkles, and keep the face looking as youthful as possible. This was even more common in China, particularly under the Shang Dynasty (in 1760 BC). A powdered face with smooth skin was extremely popular and white powders were used to achieve the whitest complexion possible. Taking it another step further, many also used gels and lotions to permanently bleach their skin. As skincare moved to Europe and the Middle East, new ingredients and methods were invented and introduced. The first cold cream was developed using rose oil and water, and melting beeswax into it. They used the mineral alum to treat scabs and used olive lead to fight acne.

They combined vinegar and lead to make a whitening foundation and used it to get rid of freckles and whiten their skin. During the Elizabethan Era, many Europeans used this whitening foundation.  The use of heena to decorate the hands was a also a tradition in the past. The use of cosmetic was time back in Pre-Christian Hellenistic period from where the historians had mentioned the use of herbal's in cosmetics and aromatic products. Queen Cleopatra a symbol for the last word in cosmetics and beautification used aloe vera gel as a skin care product. The Pliny the Elder  has written an interesting section on perfumes and aromatic materials in his Encyclopedia "Natural History". The Cornelius Celsus a Roman physician  discussed about the conditions of the skin cleanser during the 16th century. The Queen Elizabeth encouraged women to cultivate gardens and helped them in preparation of powders, sachets and scented washes a floral essence with other aromatic substance at the time, it wasn't popular to wash their faces and  bodies, so typically, they piled on layer after layer of the whitening foundation to achieve a look as pale as possible. Despite the many social strides made in the late 1800's and early 1900's, dark skin was still seen as undesirable.

Skin whitening was as popular as ever and products were made nearly exclusively for light skinned women. By the 1920's, a shift in beauty ideals caused slightly tanned skin to be seen as desirable. Cosmetics, in turn, followed this trend. Tinted face powders and lotions that emulated a tan were introduced ideals of beauty. For example, these populations used olive oil, honey and milk to keep their skin wrinkle free, as well as the pigment from clay to create lip and cheek tints to recreate a healthy glow. Another prime example is their use of a charcoal-like substance called Kohl to create thick black lines around their eyes to enhance their natural shape, believing that by following this technique, it would also protect their eyes from the glare of the sun.  Cracked lips, besides being painful, spoil the beauty of the face. The rind of Bel fruit (Aegle marmelos Corr.) is powdered and mixed in woman's milk and the paste thus prepared is applied to the cracked lips. The cracking will stop and the cracks will heal within 10 days The superfluous hair was considered to be a mark of disgrace and a large number of depilatory agents were recommended to get rid of it. Dried fruits of Aavalakatti (Emblica officinalis) and dried fruits of Pimpali (Piper longum Linn.) were used. The mixture was soaked in the milky latex of Nivadunga (Cactus: Euphorbia nivulia Ham.) This compound was applied to the desired place, the hairs from that area were found to fall off". The use of kajal has a long history in Hindu Culture. Various beauty rituals in the present day rituals such as coloring of hair, depilation and exfoliation find their roots in ancient Egyptian culture.

In earlier days, the Romans, Greeks and Egyptians used various cosmetics which contain white Lead and Mercury. Oils with essence and ointments were used to clean and soften the skin and mask body odor while dyes and natural paints were used to color the face, mainly for ceremonial and religious occasions. There was a common ancient belief that eye makeup could remove evil spirits and Improve sight these are the short history avaibled and screened various books, articals and website:

Definition:-Cosmetics can be defined as the science that deals with articles that are intended to be applied on the human body or any of its parts for beautifying, cleansing, making it to look attractive, promoting and modifying the appearances.

Types:

  • Herbal prepared face pack
  • Chemically prepared face pack

Chemically prepared face pack:

Chemically formulated face packs provide vital nutrients to the skin. Helps to popular, depending on the ingredients, acne, pimple, scar, black head and markings.

Herbal face pack

Advantages:

1. They help recover the skin's missing shine and glow in a short period of time.

2. Daily use of the natural face masks gives skin shine, enhances skin texture and taint.

3. Facial masks achieve cleaner skin and more refined pores.

4. Regular use of face masks can reduce signs of aging, such as fine lines, wrinkles and brown spots, among others.

5. They provide an even skin tone.

6. They provide Moisturize to skin.

7. They provide Oily skin control.

Disadvantages:

1. The One Face pack should not be Apply All Over the Face.

2. As every part of our face doesn't have the same type of skin.

3. Sometimes it takes longer duration of time for drying of face pack.

4. It may cause the irritation. Sometimes face pack cause redness.to skin.

5. There is difficulty of application of face pack for dry skin person.

Benefits of applying face pack:

  • Face pack nutrients to skin. Helps to reduce, acne, pimple, scars and marks depending on its herbal ingredients.
  • Usually face packs made of neem and tulsi help to reduce acne and pimple. Facepacks which are recommended for acne, pimple.
  • black heads usually control the over discharge of sebum from sebaceous glands and remove the harmful bacteria inside acne lesion.
  • The scars and marks of skin can be reduced by adding fine powder of sandal, rose petals and orange lentils with acne face pack.
  • Face packs usually remove dead cells of skin.
  • These face masks provide a soothing and relaxing effect on skin. They help to restore the lost shine and glow of skin in short span of time.
  • Regular use of natural face masks bring glow to skin, improves kin texture and complexion.
  • The harmful effects of pollution and harsh climates can be effectively combated with judicial use of face packs.
  • They help to prevent premature aging of skin.
  • Formation of wrinkles, fine lines and sagging of skin can be effectively controlled by using natural face packs.
  • Natural face packs make the skin look young and healthy.

Precautions to be taken while applying face pack

  • Select the face pack according to your skin type. Take opinion of natural therapist or concerned skin expert before applying face pack.
  • The face pack should not be left on face more than 15 to 20 minutes. Keeping for very long time may result in formation of wrinkles, sagging of skin and enlargement of open pores.

Direction

Don't try to peel or scratch the dried face pack. This may harm under lying skin. Spray water (which is at room temperature) on face before removing dried face pack. After removing the mask, roll an ice cube on facial skin. This helps to close open pores and tightens skin. It also tones and sooths the skin. Do not scrub face vigorously. This may result in eruption of pimples and dark spots. Stay away from heat when you have applied face pack. Avoid applying face pack near "eye zone". The skin around eye is very delicate. The process of removing face pack may damage skin around eyes.

MATERIALS AND METHODS


       
            213.png
       


All the natural materials used in the present study i.e., multanimitthi, turmeric powder ,  sandalwood powder , orange peel powder , neem powder, purchased from local market. The details of the plant material used for the formulation of face pack are mentioned below.

A)  Hibiscus


       
            Hibiscus.jpg
       


Synonym:  Jaswand, shoeblack plant,  Mahagua , mahoe, cotton rose, Roselle, Jamaica sorrel, swamp rose mallow, Hibiscus mutabilis.

Biological Source :- It is obtained from flower of  Hibiscus Rosa Sinesis .

Hibiscus is a genus of flowering plants in the mallow family, Malvaceae.

Colour:- Red.

Taste: - Tart flavour taste.

Chemical constituent: Tannins, quinines, saponins, flavonoids.

Uses: Provides nutrition and hair shine, Anti-aging Benefits , glowing skin , antioxidant , acne .

B) Neem


       
            Neem.jpg
       


Synonym:- Margosa, nimtree , Indian lilac, Azadirachta indica .

Biological Source:- It is obtained from neem leaves are the most commonly used part of the tree.

Colour:- Green.

Odour:-The odor of neem can be described as strong, bitter, and somewhat pungent.       

Taste:-Very Bitter taste.

Chemical constituent:-Azadirachtin , Nimbin,  Nimbidin and Nimbinin, Quercetin,   Salannin,  Meliantriol,  Fatty Acids.

Uses:- ` Acne treatment, Anti-inflammatory Effects,  Antifungal Benefits, Wound Healing,  Anti-aging Effects,  Skin Brightening,  Scalp and Hair Health.

C) Turmeric


       
            Turmeric.jpg
       


Synonym:- Curcuma,Curcuma aromatic Curcuma domestica.

Biological Source:- The primary biological source of turmeric is the rhizomes, which are underground stems or roots of the plant.

Colour:- Yellow.

Odour:- Earthy, mustard-like aroma.

Chemical constituent:- Demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin.

Uses:- Anti-inflammatory properties, Treatment of acne, Brightening and evening skin tone, Treatment of dark circles and puffiness, Exfoliation.

D) Orange peel


       
            Orange peel.jpg
       


Synonym:- Citri sinensis pericarpium, citri sinensis pericarpium, citrus aurantium var,   sinensis peel, citrus sinensis fruit peel, citrus sinensis fruit rind, citrus sinensis peel, citrus x sinensis pe.

Biological Source:- Fresh or dried outer part of the pericarp of Citrus aurantium Linn.

Colour:- Orange.

Odour:- Dry citrus orange peel metallic spicy, citrus orange fresh sweet.

Chemical constituent:- Limonene, Decanal, Octanal, Nonanal Cellulose, Hemicellulos, Pectin, Lignin, nitrogen, phenols, Fiber, Reducing sugars, Nonreducing sugars, Ca++, Mg++, Fe++, Cu++, K+.

Uses:- Orange peel powder, Exfoliation, Skin Brightening, Oil Control, Anti-Acne Treatment,  Anti-aging, Skin Softening.

D) Sandle wood


       
            Sandle wood.jpg
       


Synonyms:- Chandan, cendana, white sandalwood, sandal tree.

Biological Source:- It is obtained from extraction of roots of plants.

Colour:- Light brown.

Odour:- Woody fragrance.

Taste:- Vetiver, pine, cypress, and especially cedarwood capture sandalwood's distinct dry, earthy aromatics.

Chemical constituent:- Sandalwood oil contains more than 90% sesquiterpenic alcohols of which 50–60% is the tricycly ?-santalol. ?-Santalol comprises 20–25%. The composition of the oil will depend on the species, region grown, age of tree, and possibly the season of harvest and details of the extraction process used.

Uses:- Antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, Skin brightening, Acne treatment, Scar reduction Moisturizing

F) Amla :-


       
            Amla.jpg
       


Synonym:- Emblic Officinale, emblic, emblic myrobalan, myrobalan, Indian gooseberry, Malacca tree.

Biological Source:- It obtained from fruit of plant “Emblic Officinale”.

Colour:- Green, yellow.          

Taste:- Sour and bitter taste.

Chemical constituent:- Ellagic acid, gallic acid, apeigenin, officinalis, especially fruit, contain numerous phytoconstituents viz. higher amount of polyphenols like gallic acid, ellagic acid, different tannins, minerals, vitamins, amino acids, fixed oils, and flavonoids like rutin and quercetin.

Uses: Antioxidant, Treat the scalp, Combats Acne, Amla might be greatly beneficial for acne,  reduces Skin Pigmentation, regular amla use may lighten pigmentation and dark spots on your skin, potentially giving a more even, bright skin tone, Clears Dead Skin Cell, Repairs Damaged Skin, Gives a younger look.

G) Multanimitthi


       
            Multanimitthi.png
       


Synonym:- Bleaching clay, Whitening clay.

Biological Source:- Multani mitthi is now synthetically made and is mainly constituted of silica, iron oxides, lime, magnesia, and water, in varying amounts and is categorised as sedimentary clay.

Colour:- Brown.

Odour:- Natural, earthy scent.

Taste:- Muddy earthy flavor.

Chemical constituent:- The Multani mitthi comprises of hydrated aluminium silicates, magnesium chloride, and calcium bentonite and has a composition similar to bentonite clay.

Uses:- Multani mitthi is good for any skin type as it helps to soften the skin, improves blood circulation, removes dark spots, blemishes etc.

H) Glycerin


       
            Glycerin.jpg
       


Synonym:- Glycerol glycerin, glycerine, glycerol.

Biological Source:- It is obtained from animal and plant sources and synthetic.

Colour:-Colorless, transparent.

Odour:- Does not have any characteristic odour.

Taste:- Sweet taste.

Chemical constituent:-  Glycerin is a polyol compound that contains three hydroxyl groups and three carbon atoms. Each hydroxyl group is covalently bonded with a carbon atom. The structure of glycerine molecules is illustrated below.

Uses:- Hydrating Toner, Protects skin, Acne, Face masks including skin care, hair care, and oral hygiene moisturizer, emollient.

Method:

1. Collection: Marketed powders were collected.

2. Formulation


       
            132.png
       


Formulation procedure

? Collect powder of all of herbs – Orange peel, Neem powder, Multanimitti, Hibiscus powder, Turmeric powder, Amla powder, Sandle wood powder.

? Mix all powder as per formula in dry form and add glycerin.

? Make the paste at that  time of application by using  glycerin.       


       
            of Formulated herbal face pack.jpg
       

Fig. of Formulated herbal face pack.


       
            Application of herbal face on hands.jpg
       

Fig. Application of herbal face on hands. 


 EVALUATION

Organoleptic evaluation:-

The organoleptic parameters include its appearance, color, odor, texture, grittiness, washability, which were evaluated manually for its physical properties.

Physicochemical evaluation:-

Physicochemical parameters were determined, including the determination of moisture content, extractive values, pH and ash values.

Determination of moisture content:-

Moisture content is important for the plant drugs because insufficient drying may lead to possible enzymatic deterioration of the active principles. Moisture content was determined by loss on drying (LOD). Weigh accurately 5gms of the powder drug and take in a weighed petri dish and placed in hot air oven at 50 -56°C. It was weighed until constant weight was obtained.

Determination of pH:-

It is the measurement of acidity or alkalinity of the product measured on a scale of 0-14. pH of formulated face pack in rose water was found.

Stability study:-

The stability study shows slight change in pH of formulation which was stored at 40°C and no changes were observed at room temperature and at 35°C. There was no change in colour and odour at other mentioned conditions of stability which were showed in following table

RESULT

In the present scenario, people need cure for various skin problems without side effects. Herbal ingredients opened the way to formulate cosmetics without any harmful effect. Herbal face packs are considered as sustaining and productive way to advance the appearance of skin. Thus in the present work, It is a very good attempt to formulate the herbal face pack containing naturally available ingredients like multanimitti, turmeric, sandalwood, orange peel, neem, amla, Hibiscus and glycerine. It is suggested that the prepared formulation was physico-chemically and microbiologically stable and possessed characteristics of a standard cosmeceuticals formulation for skincare.


       
            123.png
       


CONCLUSION

In the present scenario, people need cure for various skin problems without side effects. Herbal ingredients opened the way to formulate cosmetics without any side effects. Herbal face packs are considered as sustaining and productive way to advance the appearance of skin. Thus in the present work, it is very good attempt to formulate the herbal face pack containing naturally available ingredients like Hibiscus, orange peel, Neem, Multanimitti, Sandle wood and Amla. It is suggested that the prepared formulation was physically and microbiologically stable and possesses characteristics of standard cosmeceutical formulation for skin care.

REFERENCE

  1. Okereke JN, Udebu1Cosmaceuticals: Definitions and Regulations. ClinDermatol 2001; 19 (4); 37ani AC, Ezeji EU, Obasi KO; Nnoli MC. Possible Health Implications Associated with Cosmetics: A Review, Sci J Public Health, 2015; 3(5-1): 58-63.
  2. Mary P. Lupo. Antioxidants and Vitamins in Cosmetics. ClinDermatol, 2001; 19: 467-473.
  3. Sowmya KV, Darsika CX, Grace F, Shanmuganathan S. Formulation & Evaluation of Poly-herbal Face wash gel. World J Pharm PharmSci, 2015; 4(6): 585-588.
  4. Millikan, Larry E. Cosmetology, Cosmetics, Rieger MM. Harry's Cosmeticology. In: Chapter 23, Face, body & Hair Masks & Scrubs. New York: Chemical Publishing Co., Inc, 2009; 8(1): 471-483.
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  6. Baby, A. R., Zague, V., Maciel, C. P, M., Kaneko, T. M., Consiglieri, V. O., Velasco and M. V. R, Development of Cosmetic Mask Formulations. Rev Bras Cienc. Farm, 2004; 40(10): 159-161.
  7. Banchhor, M., Ashawat, M.S., Saraf, S. and Saraf, S. Herbal Cosmetics: Trends in Skin Care Formulation. Phcog Rev, 2009; 3(5): 82-89.
  8. Chanchal D. and Saraf S. Herbal Photoprotective Formulations and their Evaluation. The Open Nat Prod Journal, 2009; 2: 71-76.
  9. Dureja, H., Kaushik, D., Gupta, M., Kumar, V., Lather, V. Cosmeceuticals: ‘An emerging concept. Ind J of Pharmacol, 2005; 37(3): 155-159.
  10. Kumar. K., Sasikanth, K., Sabareesh, M. and Dorababu, N. Formulation and Evaluation of Diacerein, 2011.
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Reference

  1. Okereke JN, Udebu1Cosmaceuticals: Definitions and Regulations. ClinDermatol 2001; 19 (4); 37ani AC, Ezeji EU, Obasi KO; Nnoli MC. Possible Health Implications Associated with Cosmetics: A Review, Sci J Public Health, 2015; 3(5-1): 58-63.
  2. Mary P. Lupo. Antioxidants and Vitamins in Cosmetics. ClinDermatol, 2001; 19: 467-473.
  3. Sowmya KV, Darsika CX, Grace F, Shanmuganathan S. Formulation & Evaluation of Poly-herbal Face wash gel. World J Pharm PharmSci, 2015; 4(6): 585-588.
  4. Millikan, Larry E. Cosmetology, Cosmetics, Rieger MM. Harry's Cosmeticology. In: Chapter 23, Face, body & Hair Masks & Scrubs. New York: Chemical Publishing Co., Inc, 2009; 8(1): 471-483.
  5. Zinnia. Ayurvedic Face Packs for Glowing Skin. Style Craze, 2017; 24. Available from: http://www.stylecraze.com/articles/5-ayurvedic-face- packs-for-glowing-skin.
  6. Baby, A. R., Zague, V., Maciel, C. P, M., Kaneko, T. M., Consiglieri, V. O., Velasco and M. V. R, Development of Cosmetic Mask Formulations. Rev Bras Cienc. Farm, 2004; 40(10): 159-161.
  7. Banchhor, M., Ashawat, M.S., Saraf, S. and Saraf, S. Herbal Cosmetics: Trends in Skin Care Formulation. Phcog Rev, 2009; 3(5): 82-89.
  8. Chanchal D. and Saraf S. Herbal Photoprotective Formulations and their Evaluation. The Open Nat Prod Journal, 2009; 2: 71-76.
  9. Dureja, H., Kaushik, D., Gupta, M., Kumar, V., Lather, V. Cosmeceuticals: ‘An emerging concept. Ind J of Pharmacol, 2005; 37(3): 155-159.
  10. Kumar. K., Sasikanth, K., Sabareesh, M. and Dorababu, N. Formulation and Evaluation of Diacerein, 2011.
  11. Cream. Asian J Pharm Clin Res Shoba rani R; Hiremanth. Text book of Industrial pharmacy, Drug delivery systems & Cosmetics & Herbal drug technology: Universities press (India) Ltd, 4(2): 9398, 5.
  12. Millikan, Larry E. Cosmetology, cosmetics, cosmeceuticals: definitions and regulations. Clinics in dermatology, 2001; 19(4): 371-374.
  13. B M Mithal; RN Saha. A Hand book of cosmetics: MK Jain, 2.
  14. Swarnalathasaraf, Shailendrasaraf. Cosmetics a practical manual, Pharma med press, 2005; 1: 126-129.
  15. Deep Chanchal; SarafSwarnlata. Herbal Photoprotective Formulations and their Evaluation, the Open Natural Products Journal, 2009.
  16. Rajeswari R, Umadevi M, Rahale CS, Pushpa R, Selvavenkadesh 5. Sampath Kumar KP, Bhowmik D. Aloe vera: The Miracle Plant Its Medicinal and Traditional Uses in India. J PharmacognPhytochem, 2012; 1(4): 118124.
  17. Ashawat MS., Banchhor M., "Herbal Cosmetics, "Trends in skin care
  18. Rani S, Hiremanth R. Formulation & Evaluation of Poly-herbal Face wash gel. World J Pharm Sci 2015; 4(6): 585-8.
  19.  Sowmya KV, Darsika CX, Grace F, Shanmuganathan S. Formulation & Evaluation of Poly-herbal Face wash gel. 4(6): 585-588. World J Pharm & Pharma Sci 2015; 4(6): 585-8.
  20. Ashawat MS, Banchhor M. Herbal Cosmetics Trends in skin care formulation. Pharmacogn Rev 2009; 3(5): 82-9.
  21. Kanlayavattanakul M, Lourith N, Therapeutic arents and herbs in topical application for acne treatment Int J Cosmet Sci 2011; 33(4): 289-97.
  22. Chanchal D, Swarnlata S. Herbal photoprotective formulations, and their evaluation. Open Nat Prod J 2009; 2: 71-6.
  23. Mithal BM, Saha RN. A Hand book of cosmetics 2
  24. Hwang JK, Shim JS, Gwon SH, Kwon YY, Oh HI et al. Novel use of Panduratin derivatives or extract of Kaempferia pandurata comprising the same. U.S. Patent 0065272A1, 2012.
  25. Mieloch M, Witulska M. Evaluation of Skin Colouring Properties of Curcuma Longa Extract. Int. J Pharm Sci 2014; 76(4): 374-8
  26. Bhat KV, Balasundaran M, Balagopalan M, Identification of Santalum album and Osyrislanceolata through morphological and biochemical characteristics and molecular markers to check adulteration (Final Report of the project KFRI 509/06).
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Photo
Sakshi Ramesh Unhawane
Corresponding author

Gurukrupa institute of pharmacy, Majalagaon, Dist. Beed, Maharashtra 431129

Photo
Vishal Ambadas Narsale
Co-author

Gurukrupa institute of pharmacy, Majalagaon, Dist. Beed, Maharashtra 431129

Photo
Prof. Nikhil Nilkanth Jadhav
Co-author

Gurukrupa institute of pharmacy, Majalagaon, Dist. Beed, Maharashtra 431129

Sakshi Unhawane*, Vishal Narsale, Nikhil Jadhav, Formulation And Evaluations Of Herbal Face Pack, Int. J. of Pharm. Sci., 2024, Vol 2, Issue 6, 977-986. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11962116

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