View Article

Abstract

Dicliptera bupleuroides is a medicinal plant belonging to the family Acanthaceae and this is a perennial herb. Dicliptera bupleuroides also known as kaalu or kirch in local language. It is found in the planes of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Dicliptera bupleuroides possessed many kind of pharmacological properties like antioxidant, hepatoprotective, antimicrobial, antidiabetic and other biological activities. The purpose of this study is to perform its pharmacognostical study, its phytochemical screening and also its physicochemical analysis to understand the plant more.

Keywords

Phytochemical, Analysis, Dicliptera Bupleuroide

Introduction

Medicinal plants or herbs are those plant which have medicinal value in them, these plants used since ancient times for their medicinal purpose and welfare of human beings. These plants mainly use to make Ayurveda medicine, as time passed different pharmaceutical industries also started to use these plants or herbs to manufacture herbal preparation. The preparation manufacture by these plants is based on established therapeutic efficacy explored from crude extract (1)(2). Now a day’s herbal preparation is widely used by different communities for their therapeutic value and have less or fewer side effect with cheap cost. On other hand medicine of synthetic origin has high cost and more side effect as they use different chemicals in them (3)(4). Ischemic heart disease where acute myocardial infarction (AMI), cause deaths in various countries ether they developed or developing countries. Heart disease problem cause various deaths, according to WHO Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death globally, taking an estimated 17.9 million lives each year (5). Myocardial infarction (MI) is the acute condition that occurs when there is imbalance between coronary blood supplies and does not full fill the myocardial oxygen demand (6). As the study goes on and different experiments done which provide the clinical evidences which reveals the involvement of reactive oxygen species in cardiovascular diseases (7)(8).  More specifically in pathological or disease conditions, such as MI, diabetes, or stroke, the production of free radicals may override the scavenging effects of antioxidants leading to oxidative stress (9)(10).

Dicliptera bupleuroides possessed antioxidant, hepatoprotective, antimicrobial and other biological activities. It contains phenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, lipids, starch, glycosides and many other compounds (11)(12)(13). Thus, in this study, aim to perform a phytochemical investigation of leaves of Dicliptera bupleuroides plant to isolate its major compounds. Preliminary Qualitative Analysis is performed to determine different chemicals like alkaloids, carbohydrates, glycosides, proteins, flavonoids, terpinoides, etc.

MATERIAL AND METHOD

Plant material collection and extraction

The plant was collected from local fields of mandi, Himachal Pradesh. The plant were washed and leaves were separated and dried under shade and then the leaves was powdered. This powdered herb was then extracted by using a soxhlet extraction method and ethanol is used as solvent. 100gm of powder was extracted with 700 ml of ethanol for 6hr. The ethanolic extract of Dicliptera bupleuroides was concentrated with distillation method and evaporate excessive solvent.

Pharmacognostic Studies

Morphological Evaluation

The macroscopic evaluation of the plant Dicliptera bupleuroides is carried out to check its taste, odor, colorm shapem apex, nature, length, width, thickness, etc. The taxonomical description was made according to the related articles and the data given in books (14)(15).

Microscopical characters

Microscopic examination is employed for the quantitative evaluation and for this purpose some cell size measured by using micrometer (16)(17) and specific histological features including, stomatal index, vein-islet and vein termination number and palisade ratio were noted (18)(19).

Phytochemical analysis

Phytochemical analysis is perform to identify different phytochemical present in the leaf of Dicliptera bupleuroides by using different tests (20).

1. Test for Alkaloids

a. Mayer’s test

Take few ml of plant sample extract, two drops of Mayer’s reagent are added along the sides of test tube. Appearance of white creamy precipitate indicates the presence of alkaloids (21).

b. Wagner’s test

A few drops of Wagner’s reagent are added to few ml of plant extract along the sides of test tube. A reddish- Brown precipitate confirms the test as positive (22).

2. Test for Carbohydrates

a. Molish’s test

To 2 ml of plant sample extract, two drops of alcoholic solution of ?- naphthol are added. The mixture is shaken well and few drops of concentrated sulphuric acid is added slowly along the sides of test tube. A violet ring indicates the presence of carbohydrates. 

b. Benedict’s test

To 0.5 ml of filtrate, 0.5 ml of Benedict?s reagent is added. The mixture is heated on a boiling water bath for 2 minutes. A characteristic coloured precipitate indicates the presence of sugar. 

3. Test for Fixed oils and Fats

a. Spot test

A small quantity of extract is pressed between two filter papers. Oil stain on the paper indicates the presence of fixed oils.

b. Saponification test

A few drops of 0.5 N alcoholic potassium hydroxide solution is added to a small quantity of extract along with a drop of phenolphthalein. The mixture is heated on a water bath for 2 hours. Formation of soap or partial neutralization of alkali indicates the presence of fixed oils and fats (23).

4. Test for Glycosides

For 50 mg of extract is hydrolysed  with concentrated hydrochloric acid for 2 hours on a water bath, filtered and the hydrolysate is subjected to the following tests.

  1. Borntrager’s test

To 2 ml of filtered hydrolysate, 3 ml of choloroform is added and shaken, choloroform layer is separated and 10% ammomia solution is added to it. Pink colour indicates presence of glycosides (21).

b. Legal’s test

50 mg of extract is dissolved in pyridine, sodium nitroprusside solution is added and made alkaline using 10% NaOH. Presence of glycoside is indicated by pink colour.

5. Test for Phenolic compounds and Tannins

a. Ferric Chloride test

The extract (50 mg) is dissolved in 5 ml of distilled water. To this few drops of neutral 5?rric chloride solution are added. A dark green colour indicates the presence of phenolic compound (24).

b. Gelatin test

The extract (50 mg) is dissolved in 5 ml of distilled water and 2 ml of 1% solution of Gelatin containing 10% NaCl is added to it. White precipitate indicates the presence of phenolic compounds (21).

c. Lead acetate test

The extract (50 mg) is dissolved in of distilled water and to this 3 ml of 10% lead acetate solution is added. A bulky white precipitate indicates the presence of phenolic compounds.

d. Alkaline reagent test

An aqueous solution of the extract is treated with 10% ammonium hydroxide solution. Yellow fluorescence indicates the presence of flavonoids.

e. Magnesium and Hydrochloric acid reduction

The extract (50 mg) is dissolved in 5 ml of alcohol and few fragments of magnesium ribbon and concentrated hydrochloric acid (drop wise) are added. If any pink to crimson colour develops, presence of flavonol glucosides is inferred (25).

6. Test for Proteins

The extract (100 mg) is dissolved in 10 ml of distilled water and filtered through Whatmann No. 1 filter paper and the filtrate is subjected to test for proteins.

a. Millon’s test

To 2 ml of filtrate few drops of Millon?s reagent are added. A white precipitate indicates the presence of proteins (26).

b. Biuret test

2 ml of filtrate is treated with 1 drop of 2% copper sulphate solution. To this 1 ml of ethanol (95%) is added, followed by excess of potassium hydroxide pellets. Pink colour ethanolic layer indicates the presence of protein (31).

7. Test for Saponins

The extract (50 mg) is diluted with distilled water and made up to 20 ml. The suspension is shaken in a graduated cylinder for 15 minutes. A two cm layer of foam indicates the presence of saponins (23).

Physicochemical analysis

This analysis included the total ash, water soluble ash, acid insoluble ash and sulphated as value and these test were carried out according to standard procedure (27)(17).

Total Ash:

Accurately weighted 2 to 3 gm of air-dried leaves and bark in a tarred platinum or silica dish and incinerated at a temperature not exceeding 450oc until free from carbon, cooled and weighted. If the carbon free were not obtained, exhausted the charred mass with hot water. Collected the residue on an ashles filter paper incinerated the residue and filter paper until the ash turned white or nearly so, added the filterate, evaporate to dryness and ignited at a temperature not exceeding 450oc. Percentage of ash with reference to the air dried drug was calculated (28).

Acid insoluble ash:

Ash was boiled with the 25ml of 2M hydrochlodric acid for 5 min, insoluble matter was collected in a Gooch crucible or on an ash less filter paper, washed with hot water, ignited, cooled in a desiccator and weighed. Percentage of acid insoluble ash with reference to their air-dried drug was calculated (29).

Water-soluble ash:

Boiled the ash for 5 min with 25ml of water, collected the insoluble matter in a Gooch crucible or on as ash less filter paper, wash with hot water, and ignited for 15min at a temperature not exceeding 450oc. Subtract the weight of insoluble matter from the weight of the ash; the difference in weight represents the water-soluble ash. Percentage of water-soluble ash with reference to the air-dried drug was calculated (30).

RESULT

Morphological Evaluation

The plant Dicliptera bupleuroides is also commonly known by the local people krech and kali booti, which is 1-2 feet in height and leaves are ovate and 2-6cm long. Flowers are purple or pink in color.


Table 1. Morphological Study of leaf of D. bupleuroides.

       
            Screenshot 2024-04-28 225005.png
       

    


Microscopical characters



       
            Picture2.png
       

    


D. bupleuroides leaf A: epidermal tissue, B: epidermis with trichome base, C: epidermis with stomata, D: vessels in leaf lamina, E: head of glandular trichome, F: glandular trichome, G: pollen grain, H: palisade tissue.

Phytochemical Analysis

The qualitative phytochemical investigation of ethanolic extract of leaves extract of the Dicliptera bupleuroides showed the presence of different secondary metabolites like Terpenoids, flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, carbohydrates, saponins and also fats and fixed oils.


Table 2. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of leaves of D.bupleuroides


       
            Screenshot 2024-04-28 225046.png
       

    

 

Physicochemical analysis

The ash value of the herb showed high content of total ash and water soluble ash followed by acid insoluble ash


Table 3. Ash Values of D. bupleuroides


       
            Screenshot 2024-04-28 225134.png
       

    


CONCLUSION

Dicliptera bupleuroides is a very important medicinal plant which have no harmful effect to human and it has various pharmacological properties like antioxidant, hepatoprotective, antimicrobial, etc. The plant have lots of active chemical constituents like phenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, lipids, starch, glycosides, and many other compounds. This plant needs to be explore more to find out more benefits and medicinal use of dicliptera bupleuroides.

REFERENCE

  1. Hassan LG, Mshelia HE, Umar KJ, Kangiwa SM, Ogbiko C, Yusuf AJ. Phytochemical Screening, Isolation and Characterization of Beta-Sitosterol from ethyl acetate Extract of Stem Bark of Entada africana (Fabaceae) Guill. et Perr. J Chem Soc Niger. 2018;43(3).
  2. Youssef FS, Hamoud R, Ashour ML, Singab AN, Wink M. Volatile oils from the aerial parts of Eremophila maculata and their antimicrobial activity. Chem Biodivers. 2014;11(5):831–41.
  3. Rashrash M, Schommer JC, Brown LM. Prevalence and predictors of herbal medicine use among adults in the United States. J patient Exp. 2017;4(3):108–13.
  4. Kumar M, Prakash S, Radha, Kumari N, Pundir A, Punia S, et al. Beneficial role of antioxidant secondary metabolites from medicinal plants in maintaining oral health. Antioxidants. 2021;10(7):1061.
  5. Nweze C, Ibrahim H, Ndukwe GI. Beta-sitosterol with antimicrobial property from the stem bark of pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn). J Appl Sci Environ Manag. 2019;23(6):1045–9.
  6. Aronow WS. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment of systolic and diastolic heart failure. Cardiol Rev. 2006;14(3):108–24.
  7. Gayathri V, Ananthi S, Chandronitha C, Ramakrishnan G, Sundaram RL, Vasanthi HR. Cardioprotective effect of nerium oleander flower against isoproterenol-induced myocardial oxidative stress in experimental rats. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2011;16(1):96–104.
  8. Wattanapitayakul SK, Bauer JA. Oxidative pathways in cardiovascular disease: roles, mechanisms, and therapeutic implications. Pharmacol Ther. 2001;89(2):187–206.
  9. Ji X. Effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza in ischemic myocardium in experimental rats. Perspect Nov Compd from Nat Prod new Millenn. 2004;
  10. Zhu YZ, Huang SH, Tan BKH, Sun J, Whiteman M, Zhu YC. Antioxidants in Chinese herbal medicines: a biochemical perspective. Nat Prod Rep. 2004;21(4):478–89.
  11. Ahmad B, Khan MR, Shah NA, Khan RA. In vitro antioxidant potential of dicliptera roxburghiana. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13(1):1–10.
  12. Bahuguna RP, Jangwan JS, Kaiya T, Sakakibara J. Flavonoids and fatty acids of Dicliptera roxburghiana. Int J Crude Drug Res. 1987;25(3):177–8.
  13. Luo Y, Feng C, Tian Y, Zhang G. Glycosides from Dicliptera riparia. Phytochemistry. 2002;61(4):449–54.
  14. Perveen A, Ijaz S, Ghaffar N. Comparitive phytochemical and physicochemical study of seeds of the genus Angelica L. From neelum valley azad Kashmir, Pakistan. Pak J Bot. 2020;52(1):257–60.
  15. Akbar S, Ishtiaq S. Morpho-anatomical, histological, phytochemical and physicochemical characterization of dicliptera bupleuroides nees. Pak J Bot. 2021;53(3):1045–50.
  16. Sonibare MA, Olatubosun OV. Pharmacognostic and free radical scavenging Evaluation of Cyathula prostata (Blume) L. Pharmacogn J. 2015;7(2).
  17. Ishtiaq S, Meo MB, Afridi MSK, Akbar S, Rasool S. Pharmacognostic studies of aerial parts of Colebrookea oppositifolia Sm. Ann Phytomed. 2016;5(2):161–7.
  18. Najafi S, Deokule SS. Pharmacognostic study of Tylophora dalzellii Hook. f. J Med Plant Res. 2010;4(5):403–6.
  19. Kumar BSA, Prabhakarn V, Lakshman K, Nandeesh R, Subramanyam P, Khan S, et al. Pharmacognostical studies of Portulaca oleracea Linn. Rev Bras Farmacogn. 2008;18:527–31.
  20. Raman N. New Indian Publishing Agencies, New Delhi: 2006. Phytochem Tech. 19.
  21. Evans WC. Trease and Evans’ pharmacognosy. Elsevier Health Sciences; 2009.
  22. Wagner H. Pharmazeutische Biology AUFI. 15 BN 3-437-20 498-X. Gustav Fish Vwelag Stuttgart Ger. 1993;184.
  23. Kokate CK. Practical Pharmacognosy. Vallabh Prakashan Publication. New Delhi, India. 1999;115.
  24. Mace ME. Histochemical localization of phenols in healthy and diseased banana roots. Physiol Plant. 1963;16(4):915–25.
  25. Harborne AJ. Phytochemical methods a guide to modern techniques of plant analysis. springer science & business media; 1998.
  26. Rasch E, SWIFT H. Microphotometric analysis of the cytochemical Millon reaction. J Histochem Cytochem. 1960;8(1):4–17.
  27. Evans WC. Trease and Evans’ pharmacognosy. Gen Pharmacol. 1997;2(29):291.
  28. Bakker RR, Elbersen HW. Managing ash content and quality in herbaceous biomass: an analysis from plant to product. In: 14th European biomass conference. 2005. p. 21.
  29. Van Keulen J, Young BA. Evaluation of acid-insoluble ash as a natural marker in ruminant digestibility studies. J Anim Sci. 1977;44(2):282–7.
  30. Harper SHT, Lynch JM. The role of water-soluble components in phytotoxicity from decomposing straw. Plant Soil. 1982;65:11–7.
  31. Sofowara A. Medicinal Plants and Traditional Medicinal in Africa Screening Plants for Bioactive  Agents. New York: John Wiley; 1993; 134–156.

Reference

  1. Hassan LG, Mshelia HE, Umar KJ, Kangiwa SM, Ogbiko C, Yusuf AJ. Phytochemical Screening, Isolation and Characterization of Beta-Sitosterol from ethyl acetate Extract of Stem Bark of Entada africana (Fabaceae) Guill. et Perr. J Chem Soc Niger. 2018;43(3).
  2. Youssef FS, Hamoud R, Ashour ML, Singab AN, Wink M. Volatile oils from the aerial parts of Eremophila maculata and their antimicrobial activity. Chem Biodivers. 2014;11(5):831–41.
  3. Rashrash M, Schommer JC, Brown LM. Prevalence and predictors of herbal medicine use among adults in the United States. J patient Exp. 2017;4(3):108–13.
  4. Kumar M, Prakash S, Radha, Kumari N, Pundir A, Punia S, et al. Beneficial role of antioxidant secondary metabolites from medicinal plants in maintaining oral health. Antioxidants. 2021;10(7):1061.
  5. Nweze C, Ibrahim H, Ndukwe GI. Beta-sitosterol with antimicrobial property from the stem bark of pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn). J Appl Sci Environ Manag. 2019;23(6):1045–9.
  6. Aronow WS. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment of systolic and diastolic heart failure. Cardiol Rev. 2006;14(3):108–24.
  7. Gayathri V, Ananthi S, Chandronitha C, Ramakrishnan G, Sundaram RL, Vasanthi HR. Cardioprotective effect of nerium oleander flower against isoproterenol-induced myocardial oxidative stress in experimental rats. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2011;16(1):96–104.
  8. Wattanapitayakul SK, Bauer JA. Oxidative pathways in cardiovascular disease: roles, mechanisms, and therapeutic implications. Pharmacol Ther. 2001;89(2):187–206.
  9. Ji X. Effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza in ischemic myocardium in experimental rats. Perspect Nov Compd from Nat Prod new Millenn. 2004;
  10. Zhu YZ, Huang SH, Tan BKH, Sun J, Whiteman M, Zhu YC. Antioxidants in Chinese herbal medicines: a biochemical perspective. Nat Prod Rep. 2004;21(4):478–89.
  11. Ahmad B, Khan MR, Shah NA, Khan RA. In vitro antioxidant potential of dicliptera roxburghiana. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13(1):1–10.
  12. Bahuguna RP, Jangwan JS, Kaiya T, Sakakibara J. Flavonoids and fatty acids of Dicliptera roxburghiana. Int J Crude Drug Res. 1987;25(3):177–8.
  13. Luo Y, Feng C, Tian Y, Zhang G. Glycosides from Dicliptera riparia. Phytochemistry. 2002;61(4):449–54.
  14. Perveen A, Ijaz S, Ghaffar N. Comparitive phytochemical and physicochemical study of seeds of the genus Angelica L. From neelum valley azad Kashmir, Pakistan. Pak J Bot. 2020;52(1):257–60.
  15. Akbar S, Ishtiaq S. Morpho-anatomical, histological, phytochemical and physicochemical characterization of dicliptera bupleuroides nees. Pak J Bot. 2021;53(3):1045–50.
  16. Sonibare MA, Olatubosun OV. Pharmacognostic and free radical scavenging Evaluation of Cyathula prostata (Blume) L. Pharmacogn J. 2015;7(2).
  17. Ishtiaq S, Meo MB, Afridi MSK, Akbar S, Rasool S. Pharmacognostic studies of aerial parts of Colebrookea oppositifolia Sm. Ann Phytomed. 2016;5(2):161–7.
  18. Najafi S, Deokule SS. Pharmacognostic study of Tylophora dalzellii Hook. f. J Med Plant Res. 2010;4(5):403–6.
  19. Kumar BSA, Prabhakarn V, Lakshman K, Nandeesh R, Subramanyam P, Khan S, et al. Pharmacognostical studies of Portulaca oleracea Linn. Rev Bras Farmacogn. 2008;18:527–31.
  20. Raman N. New Indian Publishing Agencies, New Delhi: 2006. Phytochem Tech. 19.
  21. Evans WC. Trease and Evans’ pharmacognosy. Elsevier Health Sciences; 2009.
  22. Wagner H. Pharmazeutische Biology AUFI. 15 BN 3-437-20 498-X. Gustav Fish Vwelag Stuttgart Ger. 1993;184.
  23. Kokate CK. Practical Pharmacognosy. Vallabh Prakashan Publication. New Delhi, India. 1999;115.
  24. Mace ME. Histochemical localization of phenols in healthy and diseased banana roots. Physiol Plant. 1963;16(4):915–25.
  25. Harborne AJ. Phytochemical methods a guide to modern techniques of plant analysis. springer science & business media; 1998.
  26. Rasch E, SWIFT H. Microphotometric analysis of the cytochemical Millon reaction. J Histochem Cytochem. 1960;8(1):4–17.
  27. Evans WC. Trease and Evans’ pharmacognosy. Gen Pharmacol. 1997;2(29):291.
  28. Bakker RR, Elbersen HW. Managing ash content and quality in herbaceous biomass: an analysis from plant to product. In: 14th European biomass conference. 2005. p. 21.
  29. Van Keulen J, Young BA. Evaluation of acid-insoluble ash as a natural marker in ruminant digestibility studies. J Anim Sci. 1977;44(2):282–7.
  30. Harper SHT, Lynch JM. The role of water-soluble components in phytotoxicity from decomposing straw. Plant Soil. 1982;65:11–7.
  31. Sofowara A. Medicinal Plants and Traditional Medicinal in Africa Screening Plants for Bioactive  Agents. New York: John Wiley; 1993; 134–156.

Photo
Munish choudhary
Corresponding author

School of Pharmacy, Abhilashi University, Chail Chowk, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India-175028

Photo
Dev Prakash Dahiya
Co-author

School of Pharmacy, Abhilashi University, Chail Chowk, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India-175028

Photo
Chinu Kumari
Co-author

School of Pharmacy, Abhilashi University, Chail Chowk, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India-175028

Photo
Bhopesh Kumar
Co-author

School of Pharmacy, Abhilashi University, Chail Chowk, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India-175028

Photo
Anita
Co-author

School of Pharmacy, Abhilashi University, Chail Chowk, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India-175028

Photo
Dinesh Kumar Thakur
Co-author

School of Pharmacy, Abhilashi University, Chail Chowk, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India-175028

Munish Choudhary, Dev Prakash Dahiya, Chinu Kumari, Bhopesh Kumar, Anita, Dinesh Kumar Thakur, Pharmacognostic Studies, Phytochemical Screening And Physicochemical Analysis Of Dicliptera Bupleuroide, Int. J. of Pharm. Sci., 2024, Vol 2, Issue 4, 1241-1253. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.11080874

More related articles
Analytical Method Validation of Tablet Dosage Form...
Dr Anu Jindal, Simranjeet Singh, Muskan Sood, Rajmeet Singh, Satv...
RP HPLC Method Development and Validation on OLAPA...
Sudhanshu Kumar Jha, Gopal Lohiya, Saurabh Rahatkar, Rohini Ghotm...
In Vitro Evaluation of Antispasmodic Activity Of R...
Ananya Bhattacharjee, Abhijit Mishra, Ankita Adhikari, Benazeer A...
Exploring The Multifaceted Mechanisms Of Amphetamines And Their Impact On Neurot...
Arnab Roy, Mahesh Kumar Yadav, Abrarul Haque, Pratik Mondal, Gautam Mahto, Balraj Kumar, Nisha Kumar...
Evaluation Of Antiulcer And Antiarthritis Activity Of Methanolic Extract Of Tect...
Santhosh Suddagoni, Sana Aswinini, M. Venkata Ramana, ...
Related Articles
A Comprehensive Review On Advancement In Understanding And Managing Vitiligo: Br...
Prajakta D. Gawade , Manasi V. Shelke , Rahul R. Vishwakarma , Harshal Vishe, ...
Cancer Vaccines Delivery Systems: Strategies For Efficient Targeting And Immuniz...
Parikshit Nagda, Krishna Hingad, Ghisulal Dewasi, Nirmal Sodha , Nihal Singh Rao, Bhaktraj Singh Cha...
Assessment Of Free Radical In Ethyl Acetate Extract Of Pandanus Julianettii Frui...
Krisna Dewi, Helmina Pigai, Eva S. Simaremare, Septiani Mangiwa, Aliya Rysbekova, Erpina S. M. Nadea...
A Review On Anti-Diabetic Effect Of Neem (Azadirachta Indica) Leaves...
Yogita Dhuri , Vishal Biswas, Shamili Singh, Shruti Rathore, Divyani Soni, ...
Analytical Method Validation of Tablet Dosage Form of Lurasidone HCl...
Dr Anu Jindal, Simranjeet Singh, Muskan Sood, Rajmeet Singh, Satvinder Kaur, Jaswinder Singh, Shavet...
More related articles
Analytical Method Validation of Tablet Dosage Form of Lurasidone HCl...
Dr Anu Jindal, Simranjeet Singh, Muskan Sood, Rajmeet Singh, Satvinder Kaur, Jaswinder Singh, Shavet...
RP HPLC Method Development and Validation on OLAPARIB Tablets...
Sudhanshu Kumar Jha, Gopal Lohiya, Saurabh Rahatkar, Rohini Ghotmukale, Swapnali Delmade, Kranti Sat...
In Vitro Evaluation of Antispasmodic Activity Of Rhizomes Of Bergenia Ligulata...
Ananya Bhattacharjee, Abhijit Mishra, Ankita Adhikari, Benazeer Ali, Pratham Gurung, ...
Analytical Method Validation of Tablet Dosage Form of Lurasidone HCl...
Dr Anu Jindal, Simranjeet Singh, Muskan Sood, Rajmeet Singh, Satvinder Kaur, Jaswinder Singh, Shavet...
RP HPLC Method Development and Validation on OLAPARIB Tablets...
Sudhanshu Kumar Jha, Gopal Lohiya, Saurabh Rahatkar, Rohini Ghotmukale, Swapnali Delmade, Kranti Sat...
In Vitro Evaluation of Antispasmodic Activity Of Rhizomes Of Bergenia Ligulata...
Ananya Bhattacharjee, Abhijit Mishra, Ankita Adhikari, Benazeer Ali, Pratham Gurung, ...