Archive

Abstract

SDDS is a medicine delivery strategy that attempts to increase dosage in specific body areas while increasing therapeutic efficacy and decreasing adverse effects. It addresses issues such as pharmaceutical solubility constraints, degradation, quick clearance rates, non-specific toxicity, and biological barriers. Smart drug delivery methods include nanoparticles, liposomes, vesicles, implants, polymer-based systems, PH-responsive systems, nanoplatforms, and tailored systems. Nanoparticles contain organic and inorganic features, whereas liposomes are used in cancer therapy, anti-inflammatory therapy, antifungal therapy, and gene therapy. Despite the fact that implantable biomaterials have transformed bone and dentition restoration, surgical methods continue to fail as a result of aseptic loosening and bacterial infections. SDDS aims to minimize adverse effects by regulating active molecule release in response to environmental cues. Recent research has concentrated on the creation of redox-responsive systems, enzyme-cleavable systems, electro-sensitive systems, and dual stimuli-responsive systems. SDDS provides several benefits, including focused therapy, higher bioavailability, fewer adverse effects, controlled releases, and individualized medication. However, concerns with stimulation, biological barriers, size and molecular weight, and toxicity exist. Personalized medication, nanoformulations, implanted devices, biological sensors, gene therapy, responsive administration, biosensors for feedback control, and 3D printing are examples of future methods.

Keywords

Drug delivery vehicles, Smart drug delivery, Targeting moiety, Therapeutic drug

Reference

  1. Allen, T. M., & Cullis, P. R. (2013, January). Liposomal drug delivery systems: From concept to clinical applications. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 65(1), 36–48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2012.09.037
  2. Brigger I, Dubernet C, and Couvreur P (2002). Nanoparticles in cancer therapy and diagnosis. Advanced Drug Delivery Review 54: 631-651.
  3. Panchagnula, R. (1997). Transdermal delivery of drugs. Indigenous Journal of Pha Perspective 161: 152-163
  4. Gupta M, Sharma V (2011) Targeted drug delivery system: A Review Res J Chem Sci 1: 135–138.
  5. Hruby M, Filippov SK, Št?panek P (2015) Smart polymers in drug delivery systems are at a crossroads: which way deserves following? European Polymer Journal 65: 82–97
  6. Muller R., Keck C. (2004). Challenges and solutions for the delivery of biotech drugs—a review of drug nanocrystal technology and lipid nanoparticles. Journal of Biotechnol 113: 151–170
  7. Grund S., Bauer M., Fischer D. Polymers in drug delivery—state of the art and future trends Advanced Engineering Materials. 2011; 13:B61-B87.
  8. Annabi N, Tamayol A, Uquillas JA, Akbari M, Bertassoni LE, Cha C, et al. 25th anniversary article: rational design and applications of hydrogels in regenerative medicine. Advanced Materials. 2014;26:85–124.
  9. Chang H-I, Yeh M-K. Clinical development of liposome-based drugs: formulation, characterization, and therapeutic efficacy. International Journal of Nanomedicine, 2012, 7:49–60.
  10. Kumari A, Yadav SK, and Yadav SC Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces. 2010;75:1–18.
  11. Liu D., Yang F., Xiong F., and Gu N. (2016) The smart drug delivery system and its clinical potential Theranostics 6: 1306.
  12. Bertrand N, Wu J, Xu X, and Kamaly N (2011) The journey of a drug carrier in the body: an anatomo-physiological Cancer nanotechnology: The impact of passive and active targeting in the era of modern cancer biology Advanced Drug Delivery Review 66: 2–25
  13. Mura S., Nicolas J., and Couvreur P. Stimuli-responsive nanocarriers for drug delivery Nature Materials. 2013;12:991-1003
  14. Cheng R, Meng F, Deng C, Klok H-A, and Zhong Z. Dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles for programmed site-specific drug delivery. Biomaterials. 2013;34:3647-57
  15. Gao W, Chan JM, Farokhzad OC. pH-responsive nanoparticles for drug delivery. Molecular Pharmaceutics. 2010;7:1913–20.
  16. Deamer DW. From “Banghasomes” to Liposomes: A Memoir of Alec Bangham, 1921–2010. The FASEB Journal, 2010, 24:1308–10.
  17. Gregoriadis G., Ryman B. Liposomes as carriers of enzymes or drugs: a new approach to the treatment of storage diseases. Biochemical Journal. 1971; 124:58P.
  18. Mikhaylov G, Mikac U, Magaeva AA, Itin VI, Naiden EP, Psakhye I, et al. Ferri-liposomes are an MRI-visible drug delivery system for targeting tumors and their microenvironment. Nature Nanotechnology. 2011;6:594-602.
  19. Mori A, Klibanov A, Torchilin V, Huang L (2005) Influence of the steric barrier activity of amphipathic poly (ethylene glycol) and ganglioside GM on the circulation time of liposomes and on the target binding of immunoliposomes in vivo, FEBS Lett 284: 263-266.
  20. Anderson T., Jensen S., and Jorgensen K. (2005) Advanced strategies in liposomal cancer therapy problems and prospects of active and tumor-specific drug release Journal Progress in Lipid Research 44: 68–97
  21. Li L., Tenhagen T., Schipper D., Wijnberg T., Vanrhoon G., et al. (2010). Triggered content release from optimized stealth thermosensitive liposomes using mild hyperthermia Journal of Control Research 143: 274–293.
  22. Deatherage BL, Cookson BT. Membrane vesicle release in bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea: a conserved yet underappreciated aspect of microbial life Infect Immun 2012; 80:1948–1957. Doi: 10.1128/IAI.06014-11.
  23. Zaborowski MP, Bajaj L, Breakefield XO, and Lai CP Extracellular Vesicles: Composition, Biological Relevance, and Methods of Study Bioscience 2015;65:783-797.
  24. McConnell MJ. Extracellular vesicles and immune modulation Immunol Cell Biol 2018; 96:681-682.
  25. Stewart S, Domínguez-Robles J, Donnelly R, Larrañeta E. Implantable Polymeric Drug Delivery Devices: Classification, Manufacture, Materials, and Clinical Applications. Polymers [Internet]. MDPI AG; 2018; 10(12):1379. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym10121379.
  26. Lengyel M., Kállai-Szabó N., Antal V., Laki AJ., and Antal I. Microparticles, Microspheres, and Microcapsules for Advanced Drug Delivery. Scientia Pharmaceutica [Internet] MDPI AG; 2019; 87(3):20. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/scipharm87030020. 
  27. Sun T-M, Wang Y-C, Wang F, Du J-Z, Mao C-Q, Sun C-Y, et al. Cancer stem cell therapy uses doxorubicin conjugated to gold nanoparticles via hydrazine bonds. Biomaterials. 2014; 35:836-45.
  28. Wang F, Wang Y-C, Dou S, Xiong M-H, Sun T-M, and Wang J. Doxorubicin-tethered responsive gold nanoparticles facilitate intracellular drug delivery for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Acs Nano.2011; 5:3679–92.
  29. Dykman L., Khlebtsov N. Gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications: recent advances and perspectives Chemical Society Reviews, 2012, 41:2256–82.
  30. Kirpotin D, Drummond D, Shao Y, Shalaby M, Hong K, et al. (2006) found that antibody targeting of long-circulating lipidic nanoparticles does not increase tumor localization but does increase internalization in animal models. Cancer Research 66: 6732–6740
  31. Stefanadis C, Chrysochoou C, Markou D, Petraki K, Panagiotakos D, et al. (2001). Increased temperature of malignant urinary bladder tumors in vivo: The application of a new method based on a catheter technique Journal of Clinical Oncology 19: 676–681.
  32. Pang Y, Zhu Q, Zhou D, Liu J, Chen Y, et al. (2011) Synthesis of backbone thermo and pH dual-responsive hyperbranched poly (amine-ether) through proton-transfer polymerization. Journal of Polymorphism Science 49: 966–975.
  33. Liu D, Yang F, Xiong F, and Gu N. The Smart Drug Delivery System and Its Clinical Potential. Theranostics [Internet]. Ivyspring International Publisher; 2016; 6(9):1306–23. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/thno.14858. 
  34. Lu B., Zhang J., and Yang H. (2003) Lung-targeting microspheres of carboplatin International Journal of Pharmacology, 265: 1–11.
  35. Martins E., John-Africa L., Yetunde I., Olobayo K., and Sabinus O. (2012) Eudraginated polymer blends: a potential oral controlled drug delivery system for theophylline Acta Pharmaceutica 62: 71–82.
  36. Majuru S. and Oyewumi M. (2009) Nanotechnology in drug development and life cycle management M. de Villiers (eds.), Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Chapter 20: 597–619
  37. Chan A, Orme R, Fricker R, and Roach P (2013). Remote and Local Control of Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Therapeutic Applications. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews 65: 497–514.
  38. Nakayama M., Okano T., Miyazaki T., Kohori F., Sakai K., et al. (2006) Molecular Signs of Biodegradable Polymeric Micelles for Temperature-Responsive Drug Release Journal of Controlled Release 115: 46–56
  39. Adepu S., Ramakrishna S., Controlled Drug Delivery Systems: Current Status and Future Directions. Molecules [Internet]. Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, 2021 Available from: https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26195905.

Photo
Abjel A.
Corresponding author

Department of Pharmaceutics, P.S.V. College of Pharmaceutical Science and research Centre Daphine Sherine

Photo
Gopi S.
Co-author

Department of Pharmaceutics, P.S.V. College of Pharmaceutical Science and research Centre Daphine Sherine

Photo
Sukesh Kumar
Co-author

Department of Pharmaceutics, P.S.V. College of Pharmaceutical Science and research Centre Daphine Sherine

Abjel A., Gopi S., Sukesh Kumar, Smart Drug Delivery System, Int. J. in Pharm. Sci., 2023, Vol 1, Issue 10, 31-43. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.8418711

More related articles
Effective Communication In Pharmacovigilance...
Prajakta Pujari , Sonali Magdum, Kajal Shinde, Darshani Taral, Pr...
A Review On Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System...
Ruchiket Jagtap, Manisha Savle, Gajanan Sanap, ...
Natural Polymers as Excipient in Formulation of No...
Yukti Mahajan, Dev Raj Sharma, Pravin Kumar, Mahender Singh Ashaw...
Drug Resistance In Various Disorders...
T. V. Sowjanya, B. Akhila, N. Ahalya, T. Sai Ram, T. Maneesha, V. Pavithra, ...
A Systematic Review On Production Of Bio Ethanol From Waste Fruits And Peels...
Ankita Marotrao Deshmukh, Shivani Tawade, Deepika Viswas, Siddhi Vyas, ...
Related Articles
Sexual Dysfunction among drug naive anxiety disorder patient in a multidisciplin...
Swagnik Roy, Lalhriatpuia, Raj Kumar Lenin Singh, Rajesh Rongpi, ...
A Comprehensive Review On: Role Of Artificial Intelligence In Pharmaceutical Tec...
Yuthika Sudhir Ovhal, Ashwini Gavit, Kiran Makhija, N. S. Vyawhare, ...
Formulation and Evaluation of Sustained Release Tablet of an AntiDiabetic Drug V...
Mayur Gokul Jayswal, Vasudev Sharma, Adnan Siddiqui, Raza Khan, Shaikh Aaqueeb Ahmed, Afsar Shaikh, ...
Liposomes, Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery Systems...
Pratik S. Dhone, Priyanka Shelke, Gajan Sanap, ...
Effective Communication In Pharmacovigilance...
Prajakta Pujari , Sonali Magdum, Kajal Shinde, Darshani Taral, Prajakta Chaugule, Sadhana Pujari, Ra...
More related articles
Effective Communication In Pharmacovigilance...
Prajakta Pujari , Sonali Magdum, Kajal Shinde, Darshani Taral, Prajakta Chaugule, Sadhana Pujari, Ra...
A Review On Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System...
Ruchiket Jagtap, Manisha Savle, Gajanan Sanap, ...
Natural Polymers as Excipient in Formulation of Novel Drug Delivery System...
Yukti Mahajan, Dev Raj Sharma, Pravin Kumar, Mahender Singh Ashawat, ...
Effective Communication In Pharmacovigilance...
Prajakta Pujari , Sonali Magdum, Kajal Shinde, Darshani Taral, Prajakta Chaugule, Sadhana Pujari, Ra...
A Review On Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System...
Ruchiket Jagtap, Manisha Savle, Gajanan Sanap, ...
Natural Polymers as Excipient in Formulation of Novel Drug Delivery System...
Yukti Mahajan, Dev Raj Sharma, Pravin Kumar, Mahender Singh Ashawat, ...