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Abstract

Floating matrix tablets represent a noteworthy paradigm in oral drug delivery systems, offering sustained and controlled release of pharmaceutical agents. This comprehensive review aims to provide a meticulous examination of recent advancements in the design, formulation, and performance of floating matrix tablets. The exploration encompasses diverse aspects, including polymer selection, manufacturing techniques, and the impact of formulation variables on buoyancy and drug release kinetics. The review critically evaluates the influence of innovative excipients, such as hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers, on the buoyancy and drug release profiles of floating matrix tablets. Furthermore, it delves into the incorporation of novel technologies, such as 3D printing and nanotechnology, in the fabrication of these dosage forms, highlighting their potential to enhance drug delivery precision. An in-depth analysis of the physiological and pharmaceutical factors affecting the floating behaviour of matrix tablets is presented, shedding light on the significance of gastro retentive drug delivery systems in optimizing therapeutic outcomes. Moreover, the review explores the regulatory landscape and challenges associated with the commercialization of these advanced formulations, emphasizing the need for harmonized guidelines and quality assurance standards. This comprehensive synthesis of recent advancements in floating matrix tablets aims to provide researchers, pharmaceutical scientists, and regulatory professionals with valuable insights into the evolving landscape of oral drug delivery systems, fostering further innovation and optimization in the development of gastroretentive formulations.

Keywords

Floating matrix tablets, Oral drug delivery systems, Sustained release, Controlled release, Drug release kinetics

Introduction

In the dynamic landscape of pharmaceutical sciences, the quest for innovative drug delivery systems persists, driven by the pursuit of enhanced therapeutic outcomes and patient-centric solutions. Among these, floating matrix tablets emerge as a formidable contender, representing a sophisticated amalgamation of formulation ingenuity and targeted drug release strategies. These tablets, designed to remain buoyant on the gastric fluid surface, unveil a plethora of opportunities to overcome challenges associated with conventional dosage forms.[1] The rationale behind the development of floating matrix tablets lies in their capacity to address critical limitations encountered in traditional drug delivery systems. The conventional immediacy of drug release often leads to erratic absorption patterns and suboptimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast, floating matrix tablets offer a strategic approach by prolonging gastric residence time, facilitating sustained release, and providing a controlled and predictable drug delivery profile. The intricacy of floating matrix tablets resides not only in their buoyancy mechanism but also in the deliberate selection of polymers, gas-generating agents, and formulation techniques. This complexity is a testament to the multidisciplinary nature of pharmaceutical research, where advancements in polymer science, gastroretentive technologies, and controlled release strategies converge to redefine the possibilities of drug delivery. As we embark on this comprehensive review, our aim is to delve into the definition, preparation methodologies, procedural intricacies, and diverse therapeutic applications of floating matrix tablets. By scrutinizing each facet, we seek to provide a nuanced understanding of the current state of these innovative drug delivery systems, their advantages, limitations, and the potential they hold for shaping the future of pharmaceutical formulations. Through this exploration, we aim to contribute to the collective knowledge that propels the field forward, fostering innovation and paving the way for optimized therapeutic interventions in patient care.[2]

DEFINITION

Floating matrix tablets represent a sophisticated evolution in pharmaceutical formulations, strategically designed to optimize drug delivery within the gastrointestinal tract. The fundamental principle guiding their design is buoyancy, ensuring these tablets remain afloat on the gastric fluid surface for an extended period. This unique characteristic facilitates prolonged drug release, allowing for sustained therapeutic effects and improved patient adherence. At the heart of these tablets lies a carefully selected combination of hydrocolloid polymers and gas-generating agents. The hydrophilic nature of these polymers facilitates water uptake, forming a gel-like matrix that encapsulates the drug. Concurrently, gas-generating agents create buoyancy, preventing the tablet from descending into the lower gastrointestinal tract. This intricate balance of components ensures the tablets navigate the dynamic and often challenging environment of the stomach, releasing the drug in a controlled manner. Understanding the rationale behind floating matrix tablets requires an exploration of their advantages over traditional drug delivery systems. Conventional immediate-release formulations often suffer from erratic absorption and limited duration of action. In contrast, floating matrix tablets offer a solution to these challenges by extending residence time in the stomach, leading to enhanced drug absorption and improved bioavailability. This unique delivery system also holds promise for drugs with a narrow absorption window, providing a platform for targeted and sustained release.[3] The evolution of floating matrix tablets has been marked by a growing understanding of gastric physiology and advancements in polymer science. Researchers have fine-tuned formulations to achieve optimal floatability, ensuring tablets remain buoyant for the desired duration. Additionally, innovations such as gastroretentive polymers and effervescent agents contribute to the tablets ability to navigate the gastric environment and provide controlled drug release.[4]


       
            Picture1.jpg
       

    Figure no.1


       
            Picture2.png
       

    Figure no.2


PREPARATION:

The preparation of floating matrix tablets is a meticulous process, demanding precision in formulation to achieve the desired buoyancy and controlled drug release characteristics. Critical to this process is the selection of appropriate polymers, which act as the backbone of the tablet matrix. Hydrophilic polymers such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), sodium alginate, and carbomer are commonly employed due to their excellent gelling properties and biocompatibility.[5] The incorporation of gas-generating agents is another pivotal aspect of formulation. Effervescent agents like sodium bicarbonate react with gastric acid to produce carbon dioxide, generating buoyancy and preventing the tablet from sinking. This dual-action mechanism of polymers and gas-generating agents ensures the tablets remain afloat, optimizing drug release kinetics. Various techniques are employed in the preparation of floating matrix tablets, each with its advantages and considerations. Hot melt extrusion is one such method, offering advantages in terms of homogeneity and improved drug release profiles. Direct compression, on the other hand, is a simpler and cost-effective approach, well-suited for drugs sensitive to heat or shear forces. By understanding these formulation strategies, researchers can tailor their approach based on the specific characteristics of the drug and desired release profile.[6] Preparation of floating matrix tablets involves a series of steps aimed at formulating a dosage form that remains buoyant in the stomach for an extended period, thereby prolonging drug release and improving bioavailability. This comprehensive guide outlines the process in detail.

  1. Introduction to Floating Matrix Tablets

Floating matrix tablets are oral dosage forms designed to release drugs slowly and continuously over an extended period while remaining buoyant on the stomach's gastric fluid. They offer several advantages, including enhanced gastric retention, reduced dosing frequency, improved patient compliance, and controlled drug release.[1]

  1. Selection of Polymers

Choosing appropriate polymers is crucial for formulating floating matrix tablets. Polymers with excellent swelling, gelling, and matrix-forming properties are preferred. Commonly used polymers include hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC), polyethylene oxide (PEO), and carbomer. These polymers provide matrix integrity, control drug release, and ensure floating properties. The selection depends on factors such as drug solubility, desired release profile, and tablet characteristics.[7]

  1. Drug Loading Methods

Incorporating the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) into the polymer matrix is a critical step. Several methods can be employed, including direct compression, wet granulation, and hot melt extrusion. Direct compression involves blending the drug with polymer and excipients, followed by compression into tablets. Wet granulation requires granulating the drug-polymer mixture using a suitable binder, followed by drying and milling. Hot melt extrusion involves melting the polymer and mixing it with the drug, followed by extrusion and milling into granules.

  1. Addition of Floating Agents

Floating agents or gas-generating agents are added to impart buoyancy to the tablets. Commonly used floating agents include sodium bicarbonate, calcium carbonate, and citric acid. These agents react with gastric fluid to generate carbon dioxide gas, creating a floating effect. The amount of floating agent used influences the tablet's buoyancy and duration of floatation. Careful selection and optimization of floating agents are essential to achieve desired floating properties.

  1. Excipients and Fillers

Additional excipients and fillers are incorporated to improve tablet characteristics such as compressibility, flowability, and disintegration. Common fillers include microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), lactose, and mannitol. These fillers enhance tablet properties, facilitate uniform drug distribution, and aid in tablet compression. Excipients like lubricants and glidants are also added to prevent tablet sticking and ensure smooth tablet manufacturing process.[4]

  1. Granulation

Granulation may be required, especially if wet granulation method is chosen for drug loading. In wet granulation, the drug-polymer mixture is granulated using a solvent or binder, followed by drying and milling to obtain granules of uniform size. Granulation improves powder flow properties, enhances tablet compaction, and ensures uniform drug distribution within the tablet matrix.

  1. Blend Preparation

All components including drug, polymers, floating agents, excipients, and fillers are thoroughly blended using a blender or mixer. Proper blending ensures uniform distribution of ingredients, which is crucial for consistent drug release and floating properties. Blend preparation is a critical step in tablet manufacturing and requires careful attention to achieve homogeneity.

  1. Tablet Compression

The blended mixture is compressed into tablets using a tablet press at the desired compression force and speed. Tablet compression ensures the formation of tablets with appropriate hardness, thickness, and uniformity. The compression process should be optimized to avoid tablet defects such as capping, lamination, and sticking. Quality control measures such as weight variation and hardness testing are performed to ensure tablet quality.

  1. Coating

Optional gastroretentive coating can be applied to the tablet surface to further enhance buoyancy and protect the drug. The coating material should be carefully selected to provide the desired release profile and ensure compatibility with the tablet matrix. Gastroretentive coatings improve tablet integrity, prolong floating duration, and enhance drug release characteristics.

  1. Quality Control and Packaging

Quality control tests serve as a critical checkpoint in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process, ensuring that finished tablets meet stringent pharmacopeial standards and regulatory requirements. Tests encompass a range of parameters, such as uniformity of drug content, weight variation, hardness, friability, and disintegration time. The uniformity of drug content guarantees consistent dosage in each tablet, while weight variation checks for uniformity across the batch. Hardness and friability assessments ensure the tablet's physical robustness, crucial for handling and transportation. Disintegration time measures the tablet's ability to break down in the digestive system for optimal drug absorption. Once these quality control measures are met, the tablets undergo meticulous packaging into materials designed to shield them from environmental factors, light, and moisture, ensuring stability during storage and preserving their efficacy until they reach the end user. This comprehensive approach to quality control and packaging safeguards the integrity and performance of pharmaceutical products. [8]

PROCEDURE:

The procedural intricacies of floating matrix tablet development are crucial for ensuring reproducibility, efficacy, and scalability. The step-by-step manufacturing process involves careful consideration of raw material characteristics, blending techniques, granulation methods, and compression parameters. In the initial stage of floating tablet formulation, raw materials, particularly polymers and gas-generating agents, are meticulously chosen and characterized. Emphasis is placed on assessing the compatibility of these components with the targeted drug. Rigorous testing follows material selection, ensuring both quality and performance consistency. This critical phase sets the foundation for the formulation process, where the interplay of selected materials significantly influences the tablet's buoyancy, drug release kinetics, and overall efficacy. The thorough evaluation of raw materials underscores a commitment to developing a reliable and effective pharmaceutical product. The blending process is critical for achieving a uniform distribution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) within the tablet matrix. Various blending techniques, such as dry blending and wet granulation, are employed based on the formulation requirements. Wet granulation, in particular, aids in improving the flow properties of the blend and enhances tablet compression characteristics.[9] Granulation, the next phase, involves the agglomeration of powder particles to form granules. This step is instrumental in enhancing the compressibility of the powder mix, leading to the production of tablets with uniform drug content. The choice between wet and dry granulation depends on factors such as the physical properties of the drug and excipients, as well as the desired characteristics of the final tablet. The compression process in pharmaceutical manufacturing is a crucial step where granules are transformed into their final tablet form, determining the ultimate structure and integrity of the medication. Key parameters, notably compression force and dwell time, wield significant influence over the tablet's mechanical strength, disintegration properties, and drug release profile. Compression force, applied during the process, is pivotal in establishing the tablet's hardness and breaking resistance. An optimal compression force ensures uniform tablet strength, preventing issues like chipping or breakage during handling and transport. Dwell time, the duration of pressure application, contributes to the tablet's compactness and overall cohesiveness. Balancing these parameters is essential to achieving the desired drug release profile, whether immediate, sustained, or delayed. The intricacies of compression parameters are essential for maintaining batch-to-batch consistency and meeting pharmacopeial standards. Fine-tuning compression during this phase allows pharmaceutical manufacturers to produce tablets with reliable mechanical strength, predictable disintegration characteristics, and controlled drug release, ensuring the efficacy and safety of the final product for the end-user. Quality control measures are implemented throughout the manufacturing process to ensure the reproducibility of the formulation. Critical quality attributes, such as tablet hardness, friability, and drug content uniformity, are rigorously monitored. Analytical techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and dissolution testing are employed to assess the tablet's drug release characteristics.[10]


       
            Picture3.png
       

    Figure no.3


USES:

The applications of floating matrix tablets are expansive, positioning them as a versatile and promising drug delivery system across various therapeutic domains. This section explores their utility in gastroretentive drug delivery, sustained release formulations, and targeted drug delivery.[11] One of the primary applications lies in gastroretentive drug delivery, where the tablets demonstrate the ability to remain in the stomach for an extended period. This is particularly advantageous for drugs with a narrow absorption window or those susceptible to degradation in the acidic environment of the stomach. The prolonged residence time enhances drug absorption, resulting in improved bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. Sustained release formulations represent another key area where floating matrix tablets exhibit their prowess. By modulating the release of the drug over an extended period, these tablets provide a consistent plasma drug concentration, minimizing fluctuations and reducing the frequency of administration. This is particularly beneficial for drugs with a short half-life and those requiring continuous therapeutic action.[12] The targeted drug delivery capabilities of floating matrix tablets are harnessed for localized treatment within the gastrointestinal tract. By controlling the release of the drug in specific regions, these tablets offer a targeted approach for conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases and infections. The ability to customize drug release profiles further contributes to tailoring treatments based on the physiological demands of the disease. Beyond these conventional applications, floating matrix tablets have demonstrated efficacy in enhancing the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. The prolonged gastric residence time allows for enhanced dissolution and absorption of these drugs, overcoming the limitations associated with low solubility. This opens avenues for reformulating existing drugs and expanding their therapeutic potential.[13]

ADVANTAGES OF FLOATING MATRIX TABLETS:

Floating matrix tablets offer a range of advantages that position them as a promising and versatile drug delivery system.

  1. Extended Gastric Residence Time:

Floating matrix tablets exhibit prolonged gastric residence time, providing an extended window for drug release. This feature is particularly advantageous for drugs requiring absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract, enhancing bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy.

  1. Improved Patient Compliance:

The sustained release profile of these tablets often allows for less frequent dosing, leading to improved patient compliance. Reduced dosing frequency contributes to enhanced convenience and adherence to prescribed regimens, especially in chronic conditions.

  1. Enhanced Bioavailability for Poorly Soluble Drugs:

Floating matrix tablets are effective in improving the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. The prolonged exposure of these drugs to the gastrointestinal fluids facilitates enhanced dissolution, overcoming challenges associated with limited solubility and erratic absorption.

  1. Customizable                      Drug Release Profiles:

Formulation flexibility allows for the customization of drug release profiles. This adaptability is particularly beneficial in tailoring formulations to match the specific pharmacokinetic requirements of diverse drugs, thereby optimizing therapeutic outcomes.

  1. Targeted Drug Delivery:

The ability of floating matrix tablets to remain localized within the stomach enables targeted drug delivery. This is advantageous for treating conditions specific to the upper gastrointestinal tract, offering a localized therapeutic effect while minimizing systemic exposure.[14]


       
            Picture4.png
       

   Figure no.4


DISADVANTAGES OF FLOATING MATRIX TABLETS:

While floating matrix tablets exhibit notable advantages, certain challenges and limitations must be considered in their development and application.

  1. Variable Gastric Emptying Time:

The gastric emptying time can vary among

individuals, affecting the consistency of tablet performance. Factors such as food intake, gastrointestinal motility, and physiological differences contribute to variability, potentially impacting drug release kinetics.

  1. Dependency on Gastric pH:

The buoyancy mechanism of floating matrix tablets often relies on the generation of gas through the reaction of acid with effervescent agents. This dependency on gastric pH may pose challenges in patients with altered gastric acidity, potentially impacting the tablets' buoyancy and drug release.

  1. Formulation Sensitivity:

Achieving and maintaining buoyancy requires a delicate balance of formulation components. Sensitivity to changes in formulation parameters, such as polymer concentration and gas-generating agent ratios, can affect the tablets' performance and consistency.

  1. Limited Applicability for Rapid Absorption Drugs:

While advantageous for drugs requiring prolonged exposure for absorption, floating matrix tablets may not be suitable for drugs with a rapid absorption profile. For such drugs, the extended gastric residence time may not necessarily translate into improved bioavailability.

  1. Potential for Gastric Irritation:

The extended presence of tablets in the stomach may lead to gastric irritation, particularly if the formulation contains irritant substances. This aspect needs careful consideration to ensure patient safety and minimize the risk of adverse effects. [15]


       
            Picture5.png
       

    Figure no.5


CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, floating matrix tablets emerge as promising drug delivery systems, showcasing notable advantages but accompanied by inherent challenges. The prolonged gastric residence time and enhanced patient compliance offered by these formulations are undeniable strengths. The controlled release ensures sustained therapeutic drug levels, potentially improving treatment outcomes. Additionally, the convenience of reduced dosing frequency enhances patient adherence, a crucial factor for successful long-term therapy. However, challenges loom, primarily in the form of variability in gastric emptying time. The unpredictable interplay of factors influencing stomach emptying, such as food intake and individual physiological differences, can affect the tablet's performance, leading to potential variations in drug release. Formulation sensitivity further complicates matters, demanding meticulous consideration of drug-polymer compatibility and excipient interactions. Additionally, there's a risk of gastric irritation associated with certain formulations, necessitating careful balance to ensure patient safety and tolerability. In navigating the complex landscape of floating matrix tablets, a nuanced and balanced assessment is paramount. While the benefits are clear, including extended residence time and improved compliance, developers and healthcare practitioners must remain cognizant of the formulation intricacies and potential challenges. Informed decision-making, guided by a thorough understanding of the specific drug and patient population, is imperative for the successful development and application of floating matrix tablet formulations in the dynamic realm of pharmaceuticals.

REFERENCES:

  1. Balogun, obe & ayo-farai, oluwatoyin & ogundairo, oluwatosin & maduka, chinedu & okongwu, chiamaka & sodamade, olamide. (2023). Innovations in drug delivery systems: A review of the pharmacist's role in enhancing efficacy and patient compliance. World journal of advanced research and reviews. 20. 1268-1282. 10.30574/wjarr.2023.20.3.2587
  2. Prajapati PH, nakum VV, patel CN. Formulation and evaluation of floating matrix tablet of stavudine. Int J pharm investig. 2012 apr;2(2):83-9. Doi: 10.4103/2230-973x.100047.
  3. Sathyaraj S, devi RD, hari VB. Lornoxicam gastro retentive floating matrix tablets: design and in vitro evaluation. J adv pharm technol res. 2011 jul;2(3):156-62. Doi: 10.4103/2231-4040.85531.
  4. Gharti K, thapa P, budhathoki U, bhargava A. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of floating tablets of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide using ranitidine hydrochloride as a model drug. J young pharm. 2012 oct;4(4):201-8. Doi:10.4103/0975-1483.104363.
  5. Sungthongjeen, S. & Sriamornsak, pornsak. (2011). Design of floating HPMC matrix tablets: effect of formulation variables on floating properties and drug release. Advanced materials research. 311-313.
  6. Vrettosnn,robertscj,zhuz.Gastroretentivetechnologies   intandem with Controlled-release strategies: A potent answer to oral drug bioavailability and patient compliance implications. Pharmaceutics.2021sep30;13(10): 1591.Doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics13101591.
  7. Roy H, brahma CK, nandi S, parida KR. Formulation and design of sustained release matrix tablets of metformin hydrochloride: influence of Hypromellose and polyacrylate polymers. Int J appl basic med res. 2013 jan;3(1):55-63. Doi: 10.4103/2229-516x.112242.
  8. Shanmugam S. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses. Bioimpacts. 2015;5(1):55-63. Doi: 10.15171/bi.2015.04. Epub 2015 feb 18.
  9. Portier C, vervaet C, vanhoorne V. Continuous twin screw granulation: A review of recent progress and opportunities in formulation and equipment design. Pharmaceutics. 2021; 13(5):668.
  10. Amol P. Suryawanshi, dattatraya M. Shinkar, R.B. Saudagar. Granulation techniques. Asian J. Res. Pharm. Sci. 5(4): . 2015; 203-215. Doi: 10.5958/0975-4377.2015.00013.0
  11. Arora S, ali J, ahuja A, khar RK, baboota S. Floating drug delivery systems: a review. AAPS pharmscitech. 2005 oct 19;6(3):E372-90. Doi: 10.1208/pt060347.
  12. Vinchurkar K, sainy J, khan MA, mane S, mishra DK, dixit P. Features and facts of aGastroretentive drug delivery system-a review. Turk J pharm sci. 2022 aug 31;19(4):476-487. Doi: 10.4274/tjps.Galenos.2021.44959.
  13. Prajapati ST, patel LD, patel DM. Studies on formulation and in vitro evaluation of floating matrix tablets of domperidone. Indian J pharm sci. 2009 jan;71(1):19-23. Doi:10.4103/0250-474x.51944.
  14. Baumgartner, saša & kristl, julijana & vrecer, franc & vodopivec, polona & zorko, bojan. (2000). Optimisation of floating matrix tablets and evaluation of their gastric residence time. International journal of pharmaceutics. 195. 125-135.10.1016/s0378-5173(99)00378-6.
  15. Goyal RK, guo Y, mashimo H. Advances in the physiology of gastric emptying. Neurogastroenterol motil. 2019 apr;31(4):e13546. Doi: 10.1111/nmo.13546. Epub 2019 feb

Reference

  1. Balogun, obe & ayo-farai, oluwatoyin & ogundairo, oluwatosin & maduka, chinedu & okongwu, chiamaka & sodamade, olamide. (2023). Innovations in drug delivery systems: A review of the pharmacist's role in enhancing efficacy and patient compliance. World journal of advanced research and reviews. 20. 1268-1282. 10.30574/wjarr.2023.20.3.2587
  2. Prajapati PH, nakum VV, patel CN. Formulation and evaluation of floating matrix tablet of stavudine. Int J pharm investig. 2012 apr;2(2):83-9. Doi: 10.4103/2230-973x.100047.
  3. Sathyaraj S, devi RD, hari VB. Lornoxicam gastro retentive floating matrix tablets: design and in vitro evaluation. J adv pharm technol res. 2011 jul;2(3):156-62. Doi: 10.4103/2231-4040.85531.
  4. Gharti K, thapa P, budhathoki U, bhargava A. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of floating tablets of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide using ranitidine hydrochloride as a model drug. J young pharm. 2012 oct;4(4):201-8. Doi:10.4103/0975-1483.104363.
  5. Sungthongjeen, S. & Sriamornsak, pornsak. (2011). Design of floating HPMC matrix tablets: effect of formulation variables on floating properties and drug release. Advanced materials research. 311-313.
  6. Vrettosnn,robertscj,zhuz.Gastroretentivetechnologies   intandem with Controlled-release strategies: A potent answer to oral drug bioavailability and patient compliance implications. Pharmaceutics.2021sep30;13(10): 1591.Doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics13101591.
  7. Roy H, brahma CK, nandi S, parida KR. Formulation and design of sustained release matrix tablets of metformin hydrochloride: influence of Hypromellose and polyacrylate polymers. Int J appl basic med res. 2013 jan;3(1):55-63. Doi: 10.4103/2229-516x.112242.
  8. Shanmugam S. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses. Bioimpacts. 2015;5(1):55-63. Doi: 10.15171/bi.2015.04. Epub 2015 feb 18.
  9. Portier C, vervaet C, vanhoorne V. Continuous twin screw granulation: A review of recent progress and opportunities in formulation and equipment design. Pharmaceutics. 2021; 13(5):668.
  10. Amol P. Suryawanshi, dattatraya M. Shinkar, R.B. Saudagar. Granulation techniques. Asian J. Res. Pharm. Sci. 5(4): . 2015; 203-215. Doi: 10.5958/0975-4377.2015.00013.0
  11. Arora S, ali J, ahuja A, khar RK, baboota S. Floating drug delivery systems: a review. AAPS pharmscitech. 2005 oct 19;6(3):E372-90. Doi: 10.1208/pt060347.
  12. Vinchurkar K, sainy J, khan MA, mane S, mishra DK, dixit P. Features and facts of aGastroretentive drug delivery system-a review. Turk J pharm sci. 2022 aug 31;19(4):476-487. Doi: 10.4274/tjps.Galenos.2021.44959.
  13. Prajapati ST, patel LD, patel DM. Studies on formulation and in vitro evaluation of floating matrix tablets of domperidone. Indian J pharm sci. 2009 jan;71(1):19-23. Doi:10.4103/0250-474x.51944.
  14. Baumgartner, saša & kristl, julijana & vrecer, franc & vodopivec, polona & zorko, bojan. (2000). Optimisation of floating matrix tablets and evaluation of their gastric residence time. International journal of pharmaceutics. 195. 125-135.10.1016/s0378-5173(99)00378-6.
  15. Goyal RK, guo Y, mashimo H. Advances in the physiology of gastric emptying. Neurogastroenterol motil. 2019 apr;31(4):e13546. Doi: 10.1111/nmo.13546. Epub 2019 feb

Photo
Satya Sireesha Devu
Corresponding author

Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics, CMR College of Pharmacy-501401

Photo
Neha AnkiReddy
Co-author

CMR college of Pharmacy, Hyderabad-501401.

Photo
Ashwini Vairale
Co-author

CMR college of Pharmacy, Hyderabad-501401.

Photo
Akanksha Bathula
Co-author

CMR college of Pharmacy, Hyderabad-501401.

Photo
T. Rama Rao
Co-author

Principal, CMR college of Pharmacy, Hyderabad-501401.

Satya Sireesha Devu,Neha Ankireddy, Ashwini Vairale, Bathula Akanksha, T. Rama Rao, Advancements In Floating Matrix Tablets: A Comprehensive Review, Int. J. of Pharm. Sci., 2024, Vol 2, Issue 4, 638-647. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.10956995

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